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20130201
20130228
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WJZ (CBS) 15
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the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in peace talks. >> warner: thousands of israeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
explore the legal and other issues surrounding the u.s. policy. >> ifill: then, federal and state governments sue a credit ratings agency it says gave good ratings to bad mortgage investments. >> brown: ray suarez looks at president obama's use of campaign-style events to push his legislative agenda. >> ifill: hari sreenivsan examines a million-dollar match fixing scandal shaking the world of international soccer. >> brown: and playing with the enemy: we have the story of an orchestra of israelis and arabs coming together for music, and maybe more. >> the only way that we can achieve anything that is remotely related to peace is if we sit together and talk or if we at least try to. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking
." but the cash-strapped u.s. postal service will eliminate mail delivery on saturdays. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we talk with postmaster general patrick donahoe. >> brown: then, president obama picks r.e.i. executive sally jewell to run the interior department. we look at how the cabinet is shaping up with many posts yet to fill. >> ifill: we have two stories from the middle east. margaret warner gets the latest from tunisia, the birthplace of the arab spring, where a leading opposition figure was assassinated today. >> brown: and ray suarez reports on the plight of syrian refugees who've fled to lebanon. >> at this tent camp in al-marj, in the eastern part of lebanon's bekaa valley-- only 25 miles from the syrian border-- refugees are struggling to adapt to a new, impermanent reality. >> ifill: and we close with a look at what's happening with the boy scouts, as they struggle to decide whether to lift a long-standing ban on openly gay members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour
, log onto cbsbaltimore.com. and look for this story under the news section. >>> well, u.s. lawmakers once again visit the maryland man held for years inside a prison in cuba. diplomatic efforts to get alan gross free continues. a seven-member delegation led by patrick layy. gross has been held since 2009. he is accused of spying. lawyers say he was simply bringing communication equipment to cuba's small jewish population. >>> former illinois congressman, jesse jackson, jr., could be facing years in prison. danielle nottingham reports. he could get years in prison. >> reporter: former congressman jesse jackson, jr., left a courthouse in washington, after admitting he spent more than $700,000 in campaign funds on permanent items. >> did you say you're sorry you let everybody down? >> i'm sorry i let everyone down. >> reporter: jackson spent $43,000 on a rolex watch. $9,000 on furniture. and more than $5,000 on expensive clothe clothes. his wife sandra was also in court wednesday. facing her own charge of filing false income tax returns.
topics tonight, including north korea's latest nuclear tests. and 34,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan, he'll bring home by this time next year. he'll also be talking about new gun laws. several gun violence victims will be guests at the state of the union. a teacher that survives the sandy hook shooting will be in the first lady's box. former congresswoman gabrielle giffords and her husband are joining the arizona delegation. on capitol hill, tara mergener, wjz eyewitness news. >> and we don't want you to miss wjz and cbs's news coverage of the state of the union address and the republican response, beginning tonight at 9:00 p.m., right here. >>> and still to come tonight on wjz's eyewitness news. changes in the catholic church. the latest fallout from the pope's sudden resignation. and rumors about his health. >>> when wjz returns, i'll explain how a new statewide proposal could increase safety at schools and save lives. >>> he went to the super bowl, but came back with someone else's memories. i'm mary bubala. how facebook reunited ravens fans.
low. >>> a settlement tonight between st. joseph medical center and the government. according to u.s. attorney, the hospital will pay $4.9 million in connection with its submission of false claim tols medicare, medicaid, and other federal healthcare programs. st. joseph had voluntarily disclosed that it had engaged in a practice of admitting patients to a hospital, unnecessarily. >>> an important investigative tool, a violation of your privacy. should the mta be allowed to record audio on their surveillance cameras on buses. wjz is live in northwest baltimore. that question is now befo lawmakers in annapolis. gigi? >> well, some bus drivers and passengers say a trip on the bus can be a dangerous situation and there is plenty of surveillance video to prove it. now that the mta wants to turn the audio up on some of its video cameras, some lawmakers are saying, not so fast. >> reporter: assault and attacks on bus drivers and passengers. it's a growing problem cities in baltimore are reporting. baltimore sees it, too. like this you tube video, showin
was the third most- watched program in u.s. television history, despite a power outage that halted play for 34 minutes. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to the compelling story of u.s. military veteran chris kyle. iraqi insurgents once dubbed navy seal chris kile the devil of ramaddi. a man who gained a reputation as one of the deadliest snipers in u.s. military history credited with more than 150 kills. insurgents even put a five-figure bounty on his head that was never collected. last year kile recounted his life as a sharp shooter in a best-selling book american sniper. just two weeks ago he spoke of the trouble many american troops have coming home and readjusting to civilian life. >> you're vulnerable. you're doing it for the greater good. all of a sudden you don't have an identity. >> brown: on saturday 38-year-old kile and a friend 345-year-old chad littlefield were shot dead at a gun range outside fort worth texas. >> mr. kile works with people that are suffering from some issues that have been in the military. this shooter is possibly one of
with the -- its relationship with the u.s. has left cuba in somewhat of a time warp. alan gross was hired to bring computers here. it landed him a 15-year sentence for undernining the -- undermining the cuban government. >> he has lost a lot of weight. his mind is still very with it. and he's still energetic. >> reporter: but that's about all the good news he could bring home. they met with cuban president raul castro. their message? >> on behalf of the american people and his wife judy, that we wanted to bring alan home. that he had been held unjustly for too long. >> reporter: but castro wants a swap. five spies captured in the u.s., for gross. the u.s. won't do it. >> the two situations are not comparable. both in terms of the reasons they're in jail or the circumstances of their cases. but that's been the response from the cuban government. >> reporter: van holland then revealed a new dynamic in the situation. a desperate one. >> in his own appeal, alan gross is asking be to be set free in time to visit his ailing mother. >> she's dying. and at
be asked to pay for science labs. why does that matter. >> reporter: teachers say one reason the u.s. may lag behind is that they start early, teaching the subjects to younger students. >> if we can provide a wide range of opportunities from ap courses down to, perhaps, you know, on site or school-based research experiences, to give students more hands-on opportunities. and really to let them see beyond the taxbooks. >> reporter: and make-- textbooks. and make it a tool for life. i'm gigi barnett, wjz eyewitness news. >> now, compared to other nations, american students ranked 25th in math subjects. and 17t in science and technology courses. >>> time now for a quick look at some of the stories you'll find in tomorrow morning's edition of the baltimore sun. a columbia mom is using facebook to gather support for her son, who is a victim of cyber bullying. >>> the oscar made a stop at the inner harbor. and a local woman got an unexpected gift of tickets to the academy awards. >>> johns hopkins' season opener against sienna. for these stories and mor
about the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. mission on ben ghazi, libya. >>> time now for a quick look at the stories you'll find in the baltimore sun. 12 things to help you survive the last month of winter. >>> reviews of this week's new movies. and more reports from the orioles spring training camp, in sunny sarasota. for these stories and more, read tomorrow's baltimore sun. and remember, you can look for the updated forecast, from wjz's first warning weather team. >>> a mother's plea for help echoes around the world. now, one columbia family is swamped with letters for noah. the cards and well wishes are designed to end bullying. >> reporter: in month, she learned that noah was cutting himself and had posted a suicide note online. she needed to do something fast. >> i put it out there. i was desperate. it was a survival plea. >> she came up with the idea in her head to like maybe have her friends send letters of encouragement to me to make me feel better. >> reporter: and they passed the cry for help along to thousands of others, just in
france champion concealed his drug use and defrauded the u.s. postal service. it also says armstrong and the team violated their agreement by using the drugs. >>> scott pelley has a preview of what's coming up tonight on the cbs evening news. >>> the washington budget crisis coming in just a week is threatening essential government services. will food safety be compromised? we'll look at that tonight on the cbs evening news. >>> thanks, scott. here's a look at tonight's clog numbers from wall street. we'll >>> a damp, chilly, late february evening. a live look outside. will this just stay as rain? meteorologist tim williams and bob turk are updating the forecast. first, let's go outside with tim, who has his imbrella -- umbrella up. >> definitely damp out here and chilly. but only expecting less than a tenth of inch of sleet or so. that is just enough to keep that winter weather advisory in place. 33 is where we start. rain will taper off by late afternoon. temperature going up to 45. back into the 30s tomorrow night. then we start to see sun
in u.s. history. >>> a woman in florida gets quite a surprise as she walked past her suv. two scary eyes was staring at her. it turned out she had hit an owl the day before at the florida turnpike and it just become stuck there. fish and wildlife were able to rescue it. >> she felt terrible. i would. >> sure and scared. >>> scott pelley has a preview of what's coming up tonight on the cbs evening news. >> the announcement no one on earth saw coming. pope benedict xvi becomes the first pope in 600 >>> a live look outside it's a mild cloudy monday. how will things shape up for the rest of the night? bob in the weather center and meteorologist bernadette woods is out back. sorry bernadette. let's check with you first. hello. >> no worries. it's a monday everyone understands. we are clearing out tonight and the winds are picking up. temperatures dropping down into the 30s but as we head through the day tomorrow not quite as warm as today but above average. still at 48 degrees with sunshine returning. then tomorrow night the winds start to die dow
in front. tv. but also about what types of shows they're watching. >> reporter: in the second study, u.s. researchers found preschool-aged children, can imitate what they see on tv. >> a lot of children's programming, even though it's children's programming, still shows a lot of violence. >> reporter: the american academy of pediatrics suggests children older than 2, should watch less than two hours of tv a day. and that kids younger than 2 shouldn't watch any tv at all. >> reporter: the walshes have strained their children so they know what not to watch. >> they all shouted at the same time, we're not allowed to watch that. >> if you want to be a pirate. >> reporter: they also limit tv time during the week. and make sure their children spend most of their time outside. staying active. in salisbury mills, new york, ve vinita nair, wjz eyewitness news. >> in addition to anti-social behavior, researchers found that excess television viewing in children increase the risk of criminal conviction later in life. >>> still to come on wjz's eyewitness news. i
in the u.s. >> what i'm proposing is that we reform our tax code, stop rewarding businesses that ship jobs overseas, reward companies that are creating jobs right here in the united states of america. [ applause ] that makes sense. [ applause ] >> and republicans say they're all for creating jobs as well. but they say the president's proposals don't go far enough and do enough. back to you. >> okay, mary. thank you. >>> hear from a maryland family who attended the state of the union address, coming up at 6:30. >>> catholics packed st. peter's basilica in vatican city. and lined up outside to watch as pope benedict celebrated has final ash wednesday mass as pope. he will retire in less than two weeks. danielle nottingham reports for wjz from the vatican. >> reporter: thousands of faithful gave pope benedict xvi a long ovation near the end of ash wednesday mass. the applause only stopped when the pontiff said thank you, let's return to prayer. the 85-year-old holy father looked tired at times during the lengthy mass. he was wheeled down the cente
the u.s. and russia comes between the children and their adoptive parents. >>> just before 6:30. 42 degrees. but light rain. good evening, everyone. thanks for staying with wjz. here are some of the stories people are talking about tonight. >>> another major storm tears through the nation's heartland. it's blamed on at least 10 deaths. and tens of thousands of people are without power. first warning weather coverage begins with randall pinkston with more. >>> snow plows and sand trucks are clearing roads in the midwest. as drivers cope with the second big storm in a week. nearly a foot of snow has fallen in kansas and missouri. northern arkansas is getting flurries. and the storm has moved into illinois. >> it's getting pretty nasty out here. through all of this slush and everything. i'm just hoping it doesn't get up to six inches of slush. >> forecasters say this snow is the dense kind. so heavy and dangerous, it reportedly sent at least eight snow plows in missouri into highway ditches. high winds and gusts of over 60 miles per hour, are pil
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15